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Curated by Ilaria Bernardi
Johannesburg, Keyes Art Mile, 3 October – 7 November 2019
Cape Town, 6 Spin Street, 21 November – 12 December 2019

Rome, Fondazione Musica per Roma – Auditorium Parco della Musica, 10-29 January 2020

Within the integrated promotion program Italy, Cultures, Africa promoted by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, the Italian Cultural Institute of Pretoria presents Wall Eyes. Looking at Italy and Africa, a group show, curated by Ilaria Bernardi, which aims to spark the
dialogue between young Italian and African artists on shared themes. Wall Eyes bears witness to the positive contamination between cultures, including four works created by just as many young Italian talents during or after a stay in Africa and therefore inspired by that Continent; it researches the common points between Italy and Africa, presenting a further six works by just as many young Italian talents focused on specific socio-cultural aspects of today’s Italy that, however, do not seem very different from traits of the African continent; it also hosts six works by as many young African artists, with the intent of triggering a confrontation with Italians on common themes. These are: Lhola Amira, Rä di Martino, Silvia Giambrone, Jared Ginsburg, Rodan Kane Hart, Bronwyn Katz, Andrea Mastrovito, Elena Mazzi, Luigi Presicce, Marta Roberti, Marinella Senatore, Eugenio Tibaldi, Gian Maria Tosatti, Luca Trevisani, Jessica Webster, Neill Wright.

With a view to establishing relationships with realities and institutions in the country where the Italian Cultural Institute of Pretoria is based, the exhibition, before reaching Rome, at the Fondazione Musica per Roma – Auditorium Parco della Musica, is held in two important urban centers of South Africa— Johannesburg and Cape Town—, in two very popular spaces—Keyes Art Mile and 6 Spin Street—, and borrows the works of African artists from four important exhibition spaces in the two South African cities where the exhibition is held: the Goodman, Smac and Everard Read galleries in Johannesburg, and the A4 Art Foundation in Cape Town.

Eager to make the exhibition in progress, alongside the ten works by the Italians, Johannesburg presents the three works from the three galleries in the city, while Cape Town presents the three from the collection of the A4 Art Foundation. The variation of the works on display, limited to the African
artists, is intended to evoke and confirm what Pliny the Elder claimed in the first century AD, namely that “out of Africa, there is always something new”. The title of the exhibition reveals how it was conceived, which is the same mode in which hopefully it can be enjoyed: a “wall-eyed” gaze, seeing as how it faces, at once, on one side Italy and on the other side Africa.

The exhibition is complemented by an illustrated catalogue, published by Prinp (Turin, Italy), with an essay by the curator Ilaria Bernardi, contributions by Paolo Cuculi, Ambassador of Italy in South Africa and Fabio Troisi, director of the Italian Institute of Culture in Pretoria, and in-depth descriptions of the works on display.

Curated by Ilaria Bernardi Johannesburg, Keyes Art Mile, 3 October - 7 November 2019 Cape Town, 6 Spin Street, 21 November - 12 December 2019 Rome, Fondazione Musica per Roma – Auditorium Parco della Musica, 10-29 January 2020 Within the integrated promotion program Italy, Cultures, Africa promoted by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, the Italian Cultural Institute of Pretoria presents Wall Eyes. Looking at Italy and Africa, a group show, curated by Ilaria Bernardi, which aims to spark the dialogue between young

Presented by Galerie Pascal Janssens at Keyes Art Mile, September 2019. The Invisible Generation is a site specific installation in which Pascal Dombis questions our relationship with images and how we see them today. Reading digital images becomes quite different from the conventional retinal vision of images. Images are circulating, they are continuously flowing. The viewer’s gaze also becomes more and more dynamic - there is no longer a distance from the digital images - we are immersed and we fall

Urban Gaze exhibition puts emerging photographers in the spotlight at Keyes Art Mile Open from 2 May until 30 June 2019 The Gauteng City-Region Observatory (GCRO) is proud to announce the winners of the Urban Gaze documentary photography competition. Entrants to the competition were challenged to show the Gauteng City-Region through their lens and submitted photos across five categories. One winner was selected in each category and the top-scoring image won overall. The winners are: Overall Winner: Mokone Mphela Histories and Futures: Jaco Roets Place and Movement:

Philemon Hlungwani is reminiscing on a defining moment that drew him closer to and fonder of his people, and perhaps to African traditional cultures at large. He speaks vividly about a moment that he experienced during his childhood; Hlungwani was at school and attending a class under the tree, a typical scene in most rural African villages around the 60s and 70s. His mother walked past his class, dressed up in Xibelani (a Xitsonga traditional regalia), and Hlungwani’s classmates burst-out

SMAC Gallery is proud to present Of the seeking or the finding, a solo exhibition of new work by Mongezi Ncaphayi. We have come a long way since the days when abstraction was a sore thumb in the South African art landscape and the stakes were higher for black artists on whom the burden of responsibility for more representational art was imposed. In our contemporary moment, we can now witness a diversity of styles and approaches to art in ways that

The second iteration of The Invisible Exhibition returns to The Mixed Reality Workshop (TMRW), giving audiences who missed its season at The Centre for the Less Good Idea ample opportunity to experience this acclaimed augmented and virtual reality exhibition. Opening on Saturday May 18th and running until mid-July, The Invisible Exhibition features five 360 VR films and 10 Augmented Reality Artworks. The work emerged out of Season 5 of The Centre for the Less Good Idea which ran in the Maboneng

A SEAMLESS UNION OF WORK & LIVING DEFINES THIRTY KEYES ATELIER SERIES The union of work and living has a new benchmark in the form of the just-released Atelier Series at Thirty Keyes. A collection of double-level units located within the Thirty Keyes portfolio, the Atelier Series combines a Solo apartment above a studio or showroom space. In this facilitation of both living and working, the series has all the practicality of New York’s historic live-above-your-shop approach, but with a fresh, unmistakably

Boon for Print Collectors as The Artists’ Press Limited Edition Print Pop Up heads for Keyes Art Mile This April sees the launch of new series of Limited Edition Print Pop Up Shops at Keyes Art Miles, beginning with a superb selection of works from the acclaimed The Artists' Press opening on April 4th. Building off the success of previous one-day Limited Edition Print Pop Ups that have taken place in Johannesburg over the past 6 years, the new venue at Keyes

Presented by True Design in partnership with Strauss & Co The Atrium, Trumpet Building, Keyes Art Mile 13 March - end April 2019 Seldom does the public have the opportunity to explore and appreciate a curated display of the works of a single artist from a seminal private collection. Keyes Art Mile is hosting a comprehensive exhibition of the work of Edoardo Villa (1915–2011), one of South Africa’s most enduringly popular sculptors. The exhibition, Vertical Presence: The Sculpture of Edoardo Villa, facilitates the Villa

Since it first opened in 2016, Keyes Art Mile has closed off Keyes Avenue to traffic on the first Thursday of every month so that people can enjoy an evening of art, music and casual street food in a safe and ambient environment. Due to the immense popularity of the event, visitor numbers increased over the months – at times reaching up to 6 000 people – and some of the galleries opted not to extend opening hours late into the